More inkjet on gold-leaf printing…….


Since I blog about what I am doing at the moment, there is going to be a lot of repetition going on here. I am back to working on more pigment ink, inkjet prints on gold [metal] leaf. The one I am getting ready to do is a favorite photo I made in 2010 with my Canon G10. I added a border to it in Photoshop and previously converted it to a digital negative from which I produced some nice gelatin-silver prints on matt fiber paper. A couple of days ago I received Nik Silver Efex Pro 2 as a Holiday gift. I had tried the 15 day free trial version previously, and really loved it, so now I am the happy owner of the full program. I have worked with Photoshop since around 1991, and thought I was pretty good at making black and white digital prints from my digital camera images, but this program really makes the whole process a lot more enjoyable for me, and I truly think I end up with much better prints. Since I have photographed with black & white film for the last 56 or so years,and developed most of it myself, I don’t get an inferiority complex when somebody points out to me me that I really ought to try film, and that it is so much better, and the whole rest of that silly argument. I still do my own b&w film, but also enjoy digital photography tremendously. The two photographers who probably had the most influence on my early photo interests were Eugene W. Smith and David Douglas Duncan For the last few years I have probably enjoyed Deborah Turbeville’s photos the most. So, you see, there is no predicting as to where our interests and taste will take us.
Anyhow, I worked on the above photo with Nik Silver Efex and came up with this image, which I am going to transform into pigment-ink print on gold leaf – will let you know how it all works out!

About christian harkness

Photographer and printmaker; living and working in north Florida.
This entry was posted in art, black & white, color photography, digital, digital negative, Florida, photography, Southern Photography and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to More inkjet on gold-leaf printing…….

  1. Looks like you’re going to nail it, Chris!

    I too like the NIK filters, but I haven’t yet tried the black and white suite.

    Interesting that you like Deborah Turbeville. I had a copy of her Pirelli calendar from way back in the 1970s and have really admired her style ever since then. People tend to write her off as just soft focus and floaty gauz-clad models, but there is a lot of skill and technique going on there. What is it that you like?

  2. Hi Martyn,
    Merry Christmas! Thanks for the note, it is always nice to hear from you. Uh, I am sorry to hear that you HAD that calendar…ah well, “can’t have everything, where would you put it?”
    I first really noticed Turbeville’s work when I got her book ‘Studio St. Petersburg.’ I was immediately taken by it. I think at the time I was really doing lith printing, and feeling really freed up by the whole process. I wound up with a lot of scraps of enlarging paper I had used as test strips, that really fascinated me, and I began to think that those smallish pieces of torn paper were often wonderful prints in themselves. Then when I saw Turbeville’s work I felt that there was validity to my way of thinking. From that point on, my work became much freer. In no way would I write her off as being too…hmmmm…whatever. The photo of the Russian military cadet sitting in that train station is one of the great images of that time.Anyhow, since then, I have been ‘collecting’ her books, and perhaps will get another one this Christmas.
    With all my best wishes,

    christian

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